Sunday, March 25, 2012

011 Ophiuchus

Ophiuchus (Οφιούχος IPA: /ˌɒfiːˈuːkəs/) is one of the 88 constellations and was also one of the 48 listed by Ptolemy. Ophiuchus was formerly referred to as Serpentarius (/ˌsɚpənˈtɛəriəs/), the former originating in Greek and the latter in Latin, both meaning "serpent-holder". It is a large constellation located around the celestial equator between Aquila, Serpens and Hercules, northwest of the center of the Milky Way. The southern part lies between Scorpius to the west and Sagittarius to the east. Of the 13 zodiacal constellations (constellations that contain the Sun during the course of the year), Ophiuchus is the only one not counted as an astrological sign.

It is best visible in the northern summer and located opposite Orion in the sky. Ophiuchus is depicted as a man grasping a serpent; the interposition of his body divides the snake constellation Serpens into two parts, Serpens Caput and Serpens Cauda, which are nonetheless counted as one constellation...

In 2005, astronomers using data from the Green Bank Telescope discovered a superbubble so large that it extends beyond the plane of the galaxy.[2] It is called the Ophiuchus Superbubble.
In April 2007, astronomers announced that the Swedish-built Odin satellite had made the first detection of clouds of molecular oxygen in space, following observations in the constellation Ophiuchus.[3]

In approximately 40,000 years Voyager 1 probe will pass within 1.6 light years of the star AC+79 3888, which is located in Ophiuchus.[4]...

Although Ophiuchus intersects the ecliptic, it is not a zodiacal sign in astrology. The signs are defined as 30-degree segments of the ecliptic, of which there are only twelve, and they are named after nearby constellations at the time the system was developed, rather than being defined by the constellations....

Source: Wiki

In other words, there are 13 constellations... and Ophiuchus, is the 13th one.

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